Assessing Factors Affecting the Patronage of Health Insurance Schemes: An Evidence of Ghana

Dai Baozhen, Minkah Andrews Yaw, Osei-Assibey Mandella Bonsu, Agyemang Fredua Sylvester Prempeh

Abstract


The Ghana Health Insurance Scheme was established to ensure enhancement in the quality of rudimentary health care services to all citizens. Notwithstanding the seemingly splendid financing structure, yet, there is empirical evidence of low enrolment. The study investigated the factors that have accounted for the truncated patronage of the health insurance scheme in Ghana. It also seeks to ascertain the factors that motivate individuals to join the scheme and finally examine the challenges of the scheme coverage expansion. The study used both interview, primary, and secondary data. The cross-sectional model was used to investigate the factors effects on NHIS. It was revealed that Income level, family characteristics, risk perception, and health care system delivery has an imperative negative influence on the low enrolment of the NHIS scheme in Ghana. However, questionnaires and interviews were used to find out from respondents and clients on the motivations and challenges associated with the scheme. The findings revealed that majority of the respondents agreed that access to free drugs is the strong arsenal that motivates individuals reluctant joining the scheme. The study further revealed that, majority of the respondents representing 87% have the notion that, negative attitude of the service providers at the health centers was the main barrier of the scheme among subscribers and non- subscribers in Ghana. Our results have practical implication that, intensive education should be enrolled out by the National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) to change the negative perception of people in relation to the challenges among both subscribers and non-subscribers.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/jpag.v9i1.14442

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