Cost-benefit Analysis of Seedling Production on Floating Beds in a Few Selected Areas of Bangladesh

Mohammod Akbar Kabir, Md. Moniruzzaman, Kawsar Jahan, Md. Shahjahan

Abstract


The aim of this study was to calculate the cost benefit analysis and economic viability of seedling production on the floating bed at Nazirpur Upazila in Pirojpur district of Bangladesh. The study area was selected purposively and 50 households (HHs) were surveyed through purposive sampling technique from a population of 80 households. From the results of those primary data, it was found that 68% farmers were engaged in seedling production as business purpose, and 30% as both own and business, 21 vegetables and spices seedlings were cultivated in the studied area. Average per square meter cost for floating seedling cultivation found BDT (Bangladeshi taka) 281 and benefit was BDT 401. The net benefit of floating agriculture found BDT 120 and with a BCR of 1.43. Income from floating seedlings mainly utilized in winter vegetable cultivation (Kandi), mainstream agriculture, business, house development and land purchase etc. Fifty percent (50%) of the floating farmers mentioned various constraints regarding floating seedling production such as lack of government aid, higher interest from NGOs and lack of capital. Among the surveyed respondents, 64% agreed that floating cultivation is effective to combat climate change and 76% replied as beneficial to the environment. Although floating agriculture is an indigenous age-old practice in the South-western region of Bangladesh, it can be replicated with the help of subsidy and agro-technology.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/jas.v7i2.14788

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Journal of Agricultural Studies   ISSN 2166-0379

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