Effect of Non-Financial Factors on Business Performance of Women Entrepreneurs in Service Industry in Kenya: A Case of KISII County

Pamela Nyanchama Mochache, Florence Memba

Abstract


The important role that entrepreneurship played to combat unemployment, wealth creation and the alleviation of poverty was not underestimated, especially in regions with growing unemployment rates. Women entrepreneurs could contribute significantly to economic development in Kenya, but their contribution had been documented to be wanting. Although it was challenging for both men and women to start and sustain a successful business, women faced unique challenges in their business ventures. The objective of this study was to assess non-financial factors influencing the business performance of women entrepreneurs for women-owned enterprises in Kisii County. The study was based on the factors affecting the business performance of women entrepreneurs operating within Kisii County involved in micro and small businesses in the service industry. The study attempted to determine the constraints of women entrepreneurs in the service industry by identifying constraints limiting their business performance. 


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/jebi.v2i1.6857

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