Parental Participation in Provision of Infrastructural Facilities and Their Influence on Students’ Performance in Public Day Secondary Schools in Gem Sub County, Kenya

James Ochieng Sika

Abstract


The role of parents was seen as the missing link in provision of infrastructural facilities leading to achievement of desirable performance as the government fulfilled her mandate of providing free education through the Free Day Secondary Education funds. Descriptive survey design was used. The study population included 20 principals, 184 teachers, 776 parents and 776 students. The respondents who were sampled through purposive, incidental and random sampling method included principals, parents, teachers’ and form four students. The study shows there was a significant relationship between Provision of Infrastructural Facilities and students’ performance (R = .594; p < .001). The results of the regression indicated that parents’ participation in provision of Infrastructural Facilities explained 35.2% of the variance in students’ performance (R2 =.352, F (1, 239) = 130.105, p < .001). It was found that parents’ participation in provision of Infrastructural Facilities significantly predicted performance of MFIs (B = .376; p < .001). By replacing the significant coefficients into the equation connecting parents’ participation in provision of Infrastructural Facilities with students’ performance, the equation becomes Y=24,768+ 0.376X2 +:έ. Library, toilets and laboratory in day secondary schools were found to be inadequate hence affecting their performance. The study recommends that parents should be involved in infrastructure development secondary schools as this could influence academic achievement.


Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/ire.v7i2.14477

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




 Contact: ire@macrothink.org

To make sure that you can receive messages from us, please add the 'macrothink.org' domain to your e-mail 'safe list'. If you do not receive e-mail in your 'inbox', check your 'bulk mail' or 'junk mail' folders.

Copyright © Macrothink Institute   ISSN 2327-5499