Perceptions of Prospective Science Teachers about Science and Technology Concepts and Scientific-Technological Literacy

Fatma Taşkın Ekici, Mustafa Aydoğdu

Abstract


The aim of this study is to determine pre-service science teachers’ perceptions about science and technology concepts and to express the thoughts about their scientific and technological literacy. The relational survey method was used about the perceptions of the Junior and Senior degree students of science teacher education program at science and technology concept. The data were collected through on semi structured interview form including 10 items developed by researchers. The research includes 116 pre-service science teachers. The data obtained from participants were analysed qualitatively with using HyperResearch software by open coding technique. The conceptions were interpreted in terms of determined categories and conceptual constructions. According to the findings, the perceptions of the pre-service science teachers on science and technology concepts are generally positive and the perceptions have consistency to the literature. In addition, pre-service teachers show positive behaviour to become literate in science and technology.


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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/ire.v2i1.4965

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