The Relationship between Learning Styles and Metacognitive Reading Strategy of EFL Learners

Zohreh Jafarpanah, Majid Farahian

Abstract


Learning styles and strategies are among the important factors which affect the learners’ performance in foreign language learning. The present study investigated the relationship between learning styles and metacognitive reading strategy of Iranian EFL (English as Foreign language) learners. It has also made an attempt to discover which learning style has the strongest correlation with metacognitive reading strategy. Accordingly, a total sample of 128 students who studied EFL at university was asked to answer a proficiency test. The purpose of administrating the proficiency test was to have a homogenized group of intermediate EFL learners. As the next step, the participants were asked to answer two questionnaires which explored their metacognitive reading strategy and learning styles. The data analysis indicated that thirteen learning styles out of twenty-three ones have a significant, positive correlation with metacognitive strategy. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between visual, auditory, introvert, intuitive, concrete, closure-oriented, synthesizing, analytic, sharpener, deductive, field independent, metaphoric, and reflective styles with metacognitive reading strategy. In addition, among 23 learning styles, visual, closure- oriented and synthesizing styles had the strongest correlation with metacognitive strategy. The findings revealed that Iranian EFL learners with these three learning styles use more metacognitive reading strategy.

Keywords: Learning Styles, Metacognitive Reading Strategy, Foreign Language Reading


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/ire.v4i1.8383

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