Rye Bread Fortified With Cellulose and Its Acceptance by Elderlies in Nursing Homes and Young Adults

Katharina Fuckerer, Oliver Hensel, Joachim J. Schmitt

Abstract


Several clinical studies suggest that a sufficient daily intake of fibres has positive effects on prevention of different diseases. Other studies show that most elderlies ingest too less fibres daily. As bread is one of the daily consumed food by elderly a brown rye bread fortified with three different cellulose fibres length (18 µm, 300 µm, 700 µm) was developed. To find out whether elderly would consume such cellulose fortified rye breads, preference tests and a questionnaire about fibres and liking of fibres enriched rye breads were conducted with people older than 75 years and living in a nursing home. Comparable test were conducted with young adults. Preference test and questionnaire showed that young adults favoured rye bread with 18 µm cellulose, because they associated soft crumb texture with freshly baked bread. Instead elderlies preferred standard rye bread and bread with 300 µm cellulose, because those two kinds of rye breads have similar crumb texture which is popular with elderlies. These results showed that there are differences in preferring of fortified rye bread between elderlies and young adults. Parallel questionnaires showed that elderlies and young are well informed about fibres and have a positive attitude towards rye bread fortified with fibres. Therefore given information about fibres did not increase liking of the fibre rye breads. Finally, it can be concluded that elderlies would eat bread fortified with fibers and there were differences in liking of bread between elderlies and young.  


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/jfs.v5i1.8847

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