Analysis of Faculty Knowledge of Human Subjects Protections in Research

Anissa Ybarra, Lori Kupczynski, Marie-Anne Mundy, Stephen D. Oller

Abstract


Institutions of higher education are continually engaging in human subject research at the faculty and student level. It is extremely important that all research involving human subjects is in compliance with the United

Institutions of higher education are continually engaging in human subject research at the faculty and student level. It is extremely important that all research involving human subjects is in compliance with the United States (U.S.) Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Research Subjects. If faculty and students are not following the guidelines for the ethical conduct of human subject research, their institution will be at risk of losing any federal funding acquired through these studies and risk the possibility of having all research shut down. The lack of faculty knowledge in the area of human subjects research protections has been considered non-compliance for human subjects research. The purpose of this study was to determine if a significant relationship exists between the areas of faculty research experience in higher education and knowledge of the Total Governing Principles of U.S. Codes and Regulations. The study sought to find if faculty experience in research could predict their knowledge of human subjects research protections. In order to test each hypothesis, two statistical tests were conducted. A Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) was utilized as well as a One-Way Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Findings indicated that there is no statistical significance between the amount of faculty experience in research and their knowledge of the U.S. Codes and Regulations for human subjects research protections. 

States (U.S.) Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Research Subjects. If faculty and students are not following the guidelines for the ethical conduct of human subject research, their institution will be at risk of losing any federal funding acquired through these studies and risk the possibility of having all research shut down. The lack of faculty knowledge in the area of human subjects research protections has been considered non-compliance for human subjects research.

 The purpose of this study was to determine if a significant relationship exists between the areas of faculty research experience in higher education and knowledge of the Total Governing Principles of human subjects research protections U.S. Codes and Regulations. The study sought to find if faculty’s experience in research could predict their knowledge of human subjects research protections. In order to test each hypothesis, two statistical tests were conducted. A Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) was utilized as well as a One-Way Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Findings indicated that there is no statistical significance between the amount of faculty experience in research and their knowledge of the U.S. Codes and Regulations for human subjects research protections. 


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/jse.v6i4.10023

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