The Patterns and Reasons of Committing Crimes in The Jordanian Society from The Perspectives of Inmates in Ma'an Reform and Rehabilitation Center

Abdullah Al-Darawsheh, Wala' Al-Sarayreh, Khalil Al-Hilalat, Sami Al-Jazi

Abstract


This study aimed at identifying the patterns and reasons of committing crimes in the Jordanian society from the perspectives of inmates in Ma’an reform and rehabilitation center. In order to achieve the study objectives, the researchers developed a questionnaire for data collection, and selected a simple random sample to detect the study sample. The study sample consisted of (105) individuals, and concluded the following:

The results showed that the most common crime patterns in the Jordanian society from the perspectives of inmates in Ma'an reform and rehabilitation center are the murder crimes which were in the first rank, with a mean of (4.88) and a standard deviation of (0.47), followed by drug trafficking with a mean of (4.75) and a standard deviation of (0.42), robbery crimes with a mean of (4.55) and a standard deviation of (0.52), and finally incest crimes with a mean of (3.01) and a standard deviation of (0.63).

The results showed that the most common reasons leading to crimes the Jordanian society from the perspectives of inmates in Ma'an reform and rehabilitation center are the bad partners which were in the first rank, with a mean of (4.81) and a standard deviation of (0.42), followed by family disintegration with a mean of (4.65) and a standard deviation of (0.40), and then poverty with a mean of (4.30) and a standard deviation of (0.51), and finally the feeling of neglect and rejection by others with a mean of (3.99) and a standard deviation of (0.67).

The study concluded with a number of recommendations.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5296/jse.v9i1.13822

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